the old picture – Ceropegia stapeliiformis

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c.stapeliiformis.tb

Ceropegia stapeliiformis Haw.

Depiction from: ‘B. Maund; J. S. Henslow: The Botanist; containing accurately coloured figures of tender and hardy ornamental plants, with descriptions, scientific and popular; intended to convey both moral and intellectual gratification. Vol 4. London: published by R. Groombridge 1840′

http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org

the old picture – Ceropegia attenuata

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c.attenuata.hip

Ceropegia attenuata Hook.

Depiction from: ‘W. J. Hooker: Icones Plantarum; or, figures, with descriptive charachters and remarks, of new and rare plants, selected from the Kew Herbarium. Vol. 9. London: Dulau & Co. 1852′

http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org

… it’s springtime … (what the …?)

My Ceropegia conrathii seems to think that winter is over right now, this photograph is from today. :P

c.conrathii.280714.1

Ceropegia x rothii Gürke

As far as I know, this is the first true artifical hybrid in the genus Ceropegia, that means it was made by hand pollinating, which is very complicated.

The pollen of Ceropegia radicans Schltr. was used to successfully pollinate Ceropegia sandersonii Decne. ex Hook. f., the offspring was named Ceropegia x rothii, a hybrid that is still very commonly cultivated. [2]

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References:

[1] M. Gürke: Ceropegia sandersoni Hook. x radicans Schlecht. (C. rothii Gürke n. hybr.). Monatszeitschrift für Kakteenkunde 21(1): 8-9. 1911
[2] P. Roth: Ueber Ceropegien. Die Gartenwelt 15(25): 337-339. 1911

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c.x.rothii.mg

above:

The plant in front is C. radicans, the two plants behaind are C. x rothii.

Photo from: ‘P. Roth: Ueber Ceropegien. Die Gartenwelt 15(25): 337-339. 1911′

http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org

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c.x.rothii.cg

above:

A plant in cultivation which most probably represents this hybrid.

Photo: Cok Grootscholten; by courtesy of Cok und Ine Grootscholten

Copyright Grootscholten Succulenta nursery, Honselersdijk, The Netherlands

http://www.succulenta-kwekerij.nl

Ceropegia hybrida N. E. Br.

This hybrid appeared in cultivation (… and therefore isn’t actually a natural one, by the way …) and was described in 1909, the parents are Ceropegia elegans Wall. (as Ceropegia similis N. E. Br.) as father, and Ceropegia sandersonii Decne. ex Hook. f. as the mother.

The stem is succulent as in C. sandersonii, the leaves are smaller than in either parent, the flowers are very like those of the numerous other C. sandersonii hybrids, which can be found. [1]

This hybrid is also known by the name of Ceropegia meyeri-arthuri Herter. [2][3]

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References:

[1] N. E. Brown: Ceropegia hybrida, N. E. Brown (a new natural hybrid), and C. similis, N. E. Brown (n. sp.). The Gardeners’ Chronicle 3(40): 383-384. 1909
[2] M. Gürke: Ceropegia sandersoni Hook x radicans Schlecht. (C. rothii Gürke n. hybr.). Monatszeitschrift für Kakteenkunde 21(1): 8-9. 1911
[3] P. Roth: Ueber Ceropegien. Die Gartenwelt 15(25): 337-339. 1911

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c.x.hybrida.neb

above:

Depiction from: ‘N. E. Brown: Ceropegia hybrida, N. E. Brown (a new natural hybrid), and C. similis, N. E. Brown (n. sp.). The Gardeners’ Chronicle 3(40): 383-384. 1909′

http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org

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c.x.hybrida.cg

above:

A plant in cultivation that obviously fits very well with the description.

The colouration of the flower of C. hybrida is described as follows: green at the base, light green above, and the funnel-shaped part white, marked with five broad, dull green stripes, alternating with five series of connected purple-brown spots.

Photo: Cok Grootscholten; by courtesy of Cok und Ine Grootscholten

Copyright Grootscholten Succulenta nursery, Honselersdijk, The Netherlands

http://www.succulenta-kwekerij.nl

… it’s all africana after all

Here we have three clones of Ceropegia africana, from left to right: Ceropegia africana ssp. barklyi (I have forgotten from where), a climbing form with rather broad leaves and very typical ssp. barklyi flowers; Ceropegia africana ssp. barklyi (allegedly from Queenstown / RSA), a climbing form with very succulent leaves and flowers rather like those of the nominate form; Ceropegia africana (from where?, also sold as ssp. barklyi) a very succulent, stoloniferous form.

c.africana.klone.180714.1

In my opinion the differences between the alleged subspecies are very, very vaguely, so for me it’s all africana after all. ;)

Botanical Garden Bochum / Germany

… I was there today for … perhaps the fifth time or so … there are only three plants of the genus to be found (actually there seem to be additional ones hidden somewhere as usual for Botanical Gardens)

… here we have Ceropegia linearis ssp. woodii – the ‘debilis‘ form:

c.l.woodii.110714.1

… and the same species but the more usual form:

c.l.woodii.110714.2

There are also some stems of Ceropegia stapeliiformis lying around in the succulent plants house – so, altogether ‘very special’ plants … wow ….

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